niman

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  1. http://www.renseradio.com/listenlive.htm
  2. 10 PM EST tonight Dr. Henry L. Niman, PhDFlu Vax Update
  3. http://www.renseradio.com/listenlive.htm
  4. Aug 17 mp3 http://rense2.gsradio.net/rense/special/rense_081717_hr1.mp3
  5. Tonight at 10 PM EDT Dr. Henry L. Niman, PhDHome DNA Testing
  6. http://www.renseradio.com/listenlive.htm
  7. THURSDAY Dr. Henry L. Niman, PhD Personal DNA Testing
  8. http://rense2.gsradio.net/rense/special/rense_072017_hr1.mp3
  9. http://rense2.gsradio.net/rense/special/rense_072017_hr1.mp3
  10. Tonight at 10 PM EDT Dr. Henry L. Niman, PhDThe DNA Databasing Of America
  11. http://www.renseradio.com/listenlive.htm
  12. Tonight at 10 PM EDT Dr. Henry L. Niman, PhDThe DNA Databasing Of America
  13. References Rasmussen SA, Jamieson DJ, Honein MA, Petersen LR. Zika virus and birth defects—reviewing the evidence for causality. N Engl J Med 2016;374:1981–7. CrossRef PubMed Oduyebo T, Igbinosa I, Petersen EE, et al. Update: interim guidance for health care providers caring for pregnant women with possible Zika virus exposure—United States, July 2016. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2016;65:739–44. CrossRef PubMed Simeone RM, Shapiro-Mendoza CK, Meaney-Delman D, et al. ; Zika and Pregnancy Working Group. Possible Zika virus infection among pregnant women—United States and territories, May 2016. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2016;65:514–9. CrossRef PubMed Honein MA, Dawson AL, Petersen EE, et al. ; US Zika Pregnancy Registry Collaboration. Birth defects among fetuses and infants of US women with evidence of possible Zika virus infection during pregnancy. JAMA 2017;317:59–68. CrossRef PubMed Reynolds MR, Jones AM, Petersen EE, et al. ; U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry Collaboration. Vital signs: update on Zika virus-associated birth defects and evaluation of all U.S. infants with congenital Zika virus exposure—U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry, 2016. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2017;66:366–73.CrossRef PubMed Russell K, Oliver SE, Lewis L, et al. ; Contributors. Update: interim guidance for the evaluation and management of infants with possible congenital Zika virus infection—United States, August 2016. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2016;65:870–8. CrossRef PubMed Cuevas EL, Tong VT, Rozo N, et al. Preliminary report of microcephaly potentially associated with Zika virus infection during pregnancy—Colombia, January–November 2016. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2016;65:1409–13. CrossRef PubMed Pass RF, Fowler KB, Boppana SB, Britt WJ, Stagno S. Congenital cytomegalovirus infection following first trimester maternal infection: symptoms at birth and outcome. J Clin Virol 2006;35:216–20. CrossRef PubMed Cragan JD, Isenburg JL, Parker SE, et al. ; National Birth Defects Prevention Network. Population-based microcephaly surveillance in the United States, 2009 to 2013: An analysis of potential sources of variation. Birth Defects Res A Clin Mol Teratol 2016;106:972–82. CrossRef PubMed Duffy MR, Chen TH, Hancock WT, et al. Zika virus outbreak on Yap Island, Federated States of Micronesia. N Engl J Med 2009;360:2536–43. CrossRefPubMed
  14. TABLE 2. Infant Zika virus testing and screening at birth for 2,464 live-born infants from completed pregnancies with laboratory evidence of recent possible Zika virus infection — Zika Pregnancy and Infant Registries,* U.S. territories, January 1, 2016–April 25, 2017 Testing and screening Live-born infants With birth defects† No. (%) Without birth defects No. (%) Total No. (%) Total 116 (5) 2,348 (95) 2,464 (100) Infant Zika virus testing ≥1 infant specimen§ test result reported to Zika pregnancy and infant registries 64 (55) 1,381 (59) 1,445 (59) Infant screening at birth Postnatal neuroimaging¶ conducted and findings reported to Zika pregnancy and infant registries 69 (59) 1,219 (52) 1,288 (52) Hearing screening conducted and results reported to Zika pregnancy and infant registries 105 (91) 1,840 (78) 1,945 (79) * U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry and Puerto Rico Zika Active Pregnancy Surveillance System. † Includes infants with one or more of the following birth defects potentially associated with Zika virus infection: brain abnormality and/or microcephaly or possible microcephaly, neural tube defect and other early brain malformation, eye abnormality, or consequence of central nervous system dysfunction. § Infant specimens include serum, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid. ¶ Neuroimaging includes any imaging of the infant head, including cranial ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, or radiograph reported to the Zika pregnancy registries based on neuroimaging guidance published August 19, 2016. (Russell K, Oliver SE, Lewis L, et al. Update: interim guidance for the evaluation and management of infants with possible congenital Zika virus infection—United States, August 2016. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2016;65:870–8).
  15. TABLE 1. Pregnancy outcomes* for 2,549 completed pregnancies† with laboratory evidence of recent possible maternal Zika virus infection, by symptom status and timing of symptom onset or specimen collection date — Zika Pregnancy and Infant Registries,§ U.S. territories, January 1, 2016–April 25, 2017 Characteristic No. with brain abnormalities and/or microcephaly¶ No. with NTDs and early brain malformations, eye abnormalities, or consequence of CNS dysfunction without brain abnormalities or microcephaly Total no. with ≥1 birth defect Total no. of completed pregnancies Percentage with Zika virus–associated birth defect (95% CI**) Any laboratory evidence of recent possible Zika virus infection†† Total 108 14 122 2,549 5 (4–6) Maternal symptom status§§ Symptoms of Zika virus infection reported 68 11 79 1,561 5 (4–6) No symptoms of Zika virus infection reported 38 3 41 966 4 (3–6) Timing¶¶ of symptoms or specimen collection date*** First trimester††† 27 5 32 536 6 (4–8) Second trimester§§§ 46 5 51 1,096 5 (4–6) Third trimester¶¶¶ 31 4 35 876 4 (3–6) Recent NAT-confirmed Zika virus infection in maternal, placental, fetal, or infant specimen**** Total 71 9 80 1,508 5 (4–7) Maternal symptom status†††† Symptoms of Zika virus infection reported 54 9 63 1,279 5 (4–6) No symptoms of Zika virus infection reported 16 0 16 225 7 (4–11) Timing§§§§ of symptoms or specimen collection date*** First trimester††† 18 4 22 276 8 (5–12) Second trimester§§§ 34 2 36 726 5 (4–7) Third trimester¶¶¶ 17 3 20 494 4 (3–6) Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; CNS = central nervous system; IgM = immunoglobulin M; NAT = nucleic acid test; NTD = neural tube defect; RT-PCR = reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. * Outcomes for multiple gestation pregnancies are counted once. † Includes 2,464 live births and 85 pregnancy losses. § U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry and Puerto Rico Zika Active Pregnancy Surveillance System. ¶ Microcephaly was defined as head circumference at delivery <3rd percentile for infant sex and gestational age regardless of birthweight. When multiple head circumference measurements were available, the majority of those measurements had to be <3rd percentile for a designation of microcephaly. A clinical diagnosis of microcephaly or mention of microcephaly or small head in the medical record was not required. (https://www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/pregnancy-outcomes.html). ** 95% CI for a binomial proportion using Wilson score interval. †† Includes maternal, placental, fetal, or infant laboratory evidence of recent possible Zika virus infection based on presence of Zika virus RNA by a positive NAT (e.g., RT-PCR), serologic evidence of a recent Zika virus infection, or serologic evidence of a recent unspecified flavivirus infection. §§ Maternal symptom (i.e., fever, rash, arthralgia, or conjunctivitis) status was unknown for 22 completed pregnancies; of these, two resulted in fetuses or infants with brain abnormalities with or without microcephaly. ¶¶ Maternal Zika virus infection was reported in the periconceptional period (i.e., the 8 weeks before conception [6 weeks before and 2 weeks after the first day of the last menstrual period]) in 21 completed pregnancies; of these, one resulted in a fetus or infant with brain abnormalities with or without microcephaly. Timing of maternal Zika virus infection was unknown for 20 completed pregnancies; of these, three resulted in fetuses or infants with brain abnormalities with or without microcephaly. *** Gestational timing of Zika virus infection was calculated using the earliest date of maternal serum, urine, or whole blood collection that tested positive for Zika virus infection by NAT or serologic testing or symptom onset date if symptomatic. ††† First trimester is defined as 2 weeks after last menstrual period to 13 weeks, 6 days gestational age based on estimated date of delivery. §§§ Second trimester is defined as 14 weeks to 27 weeks, 6 days gestational age based on estimated date of delivery. ¶¶¶ Third trimester is defined as 28 weeks gestational age or later based on estimated date of delivery. **** Includes maternal, placental, fetal, or infant laboratory evidence of Zika virus infection based on the presence of Zika virus RNA by a positive NAT (e.g., RT-PCR). †††† Maternal symptom status was unknown for four completed pregnancies; of these, one resulted in a fetus or infant with brain abnormalities with or without microcephaly. §§§§ Maternal Zika virus infection was reported in the periconceptional period (i.e., the 8 weeks before conception [6 weeks before and 2 weeks after the first day of last menstrual period]) in six pregnancies; of these, one resulted in a fetus or infant with brain abnormalities with or without microcephaly. Timing of maternal Zika virus infection was unknown for six pregnancies; of these, two resulted in fetuses or infants with brain abnormalities with or without microcephaly.