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H7N2 Confirmation In New York Cats Exceeds 100

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The City has found a strain of the Influenza A virus in more than 100 cats at City animal shelters. It is not known how the cats contracted the virus, which was first found in cats at the Manhattan shelter. This type of flu virus causes a mild illness in cats and poses little risk to people. All of the infected cats are expected to recover.
http://www1.nyc.gov/nyc-resources/service/6344/flu-virus-in-cats

 

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The City has found a strain of the Influenza A virus in more than 100 cats at City animal shelters. It is not known how the cats contracted the virus, which was first found in cats at the Manhattan shelter. This type of flu virus causes a mild illness in cats and poses little risk to people. All of the infected cats are expected to recover.

If you adopted a cat from a City animal shelter since November 12, your cat may have been infected. You should keep it separated from other animals. If it is showing flu-like symptoms (coughing, sniffling, fever), you should call your veterinarian before taking it in for an examination. 

Your cat will not need to be tested for Influenza A unless it lived in a City shelter after November 12 and is showing symptoms of the flu.

Health Risks for People 

A veterinarian who works with sick cats at the Manhattan shelter was diagnosed with the strain of Influenza A that has been found in cats. This person experienced a mild illness that was quickly resolved. No other Animal Care and Control employees or cat owners have been found to have the illness.

If you adopted a cat from a City shelter since November 12 and are feeling flu-like symptoms, or you think you may have pink eye (conjunctivitis), you should see your doctor or contact the Health Department.

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Our Care Center Locations


Manhattan Animal Care Center

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326 East 110th Street (between 1st and 2nd Aves.)
New York, NY 10029
Shelter Hours: 8AM - 8PM, 7 days a week
Adoption Hours: Mon-Fri: 12-8pm, Sat & Sun: 10am-6pm
Intake Hours: Open 24 hours for stray and owner surrender intakes 
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Brooklyn Animal Care Center

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2336 Linden Boulevard
Brooklyn, NY 11208
Shelter Hours: 8AM - 8PM, 7 days a week
Adoption Hours:Mon-Fri: 12-8pm, Sat & Sun: 10am-6pm
Closed on all Holidays and Training Days, as listed on the right side of this page.
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Staten Island Animal Care Center

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3139 Veterans Road West
Staten Island, NY 10309
Shelter Hours: 8AM - 8PM, 7 days a week
Adoption Hours: Mon-Fri: 12-8pm, Sat & Sun: 10am-6pm
Closed on all Holidays and Training Days, as listed on the right side of this page.
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Queens Admissions Center

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92-29 Queens Boulevard
Rego Park, NY 11374
Admissions Hours: 8AM - 8PM, 7 days a week
For services on other days and all adoption services, please visit the Brooklyn Care Center.

NOTE: Admissions Center will open at 11 AM on January 25, 2016
Closed on all Holidays, as listed below on the right side of this page.
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Bronx Admissions Center

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464 East Fordham Road
Bronx, NY 10458
Admissions Hours: 8AM - 8PM, 7 days a week
For services on other days and all adoption services, please visit the Manhattan Care Center.

NOTE: Admissions Center will open at 11 AM on January 25, 2016
Closed on all Holidays, as listed below on the right side of this page.
Map & Directions


Headquarters

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Administrative Offices ONLY - No animals at this location

11 Park Place, Suite 805
New York, NY 10007

 

http://www.nycacc.org/locations.htm

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Out of 125 shelter cats with bird flu, 4 on Staten Island

 
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Testing cats for the avian flu has been ongoing since November and adoptions have been suspended. (File photo)
 
 
 

STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. - People hoping to adopt a cat from a city shelter for Christmas or Hanukkah were disappointed after a breakout of bird flu sickened 125 shelter felines, and adoptions were suspended while Animal Care Centers of NYC gets a hold on the virus.

As of Dec. 20, there were 91 cats in the Manhattan ACC shelter that tested positive for H7N2, the bird flu, 30 in Brooklyn, and four in Staten Island out of a total 201 cats with test results. Additional test results are pending.

According to the city Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, only the cats in NYC animal shelters have tested positive for H7N2. Cats that have been adopted from the ACC have not been tested.

More than 350 people were screened for the virus, with one veterinarian testing positive. Flu symptoms were mild and the person has completely recovered, according to the Health Department.

Testing began mid-November, first with 45 cats in an ACC shelter in Manhattan testing positive for the flu, most experiencing mild illness and expected to recover. One elderly cat had underlying health issues, developed severe pneumonia and was humanely euthanized, the Health Department said.

Signs of the virus include sneezing, coughing, runny nose and runny or red eyes. It can spread if a cat has contact with another infected cat or with objects (such as kitty litter or food bowls) used by sick animals.

There is no influenza vaccine for cats and there are no medicines available to treat the flu in cats. Veterinarians may use other medicines, such as pain relievers, antibiotics or intravenous fluids, to help the cat recover.

Illness is usually mild and most cats recover quickly.

The infected cats have been separated so as not to expose other animals at the shelter.

The Health Department, working with ACC, the ASPCA and New York City Emergency Management, will soon move cats to a new quarantine location, which will allow shelters to resume their normal intake and adoption of cats. 

Cats are the only animals that have tested positive for the flu, so all other shelter operations have continued.

Until cats are removed to the new location and the cat facilities are disinfected, New Yorkers should not to drop off cats at any ACC shelter.

The risk of transmission of H7N2 from cats to humans is low.

The symptoms of seasonal flu viruses and H7N2 are similar, and medications that treat seasonal flu also treat H7N2 virus infections, the Health Department said.

http://www.silive.com/news/index.ssf/2016/12/out_of_125_shelter_cats_with_a.html

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Avian Influenza A (H7N2) in Cats in Animal Shelters in NY; One Human Infection

December 22, 2016 — An outbreak of avian lineage influenza A H7N2 (“H7N2”) virus infection among cats in an animal shelter in New York City was first reported on December 9, 2016. CDC has confirmed one associated human infection in a person who had close, prolonged unprotected exposure to the respiratory secretions of infected, sick cats at an affected New York City animal shelter. The person had relatively mild illness and is recovering. No person-to-person spread of this virus has been identified at this time. CDC believes the risk to the public’s health from this virus is low, but CDC and state and local public health authorities are conducting a routine investigation to try to identify any other human infections associated with exposure to ill cats and ensure that there is no person-to-person spread of this virus occurring.

Avian influenza viruses have rarely been reported in cats, but it is possible for cats to be infected with influenza, including avian influenza viruses. This is the third human infection with avian influenza A H7N2 ever reported in the United States. Previously there have been two human infections with similar H7N2 occurring in 2002 (VA) and 2003 (NY). One of these infections was associated with exposure to infected poultry. The source of infection in the second person could not be determined. Both people who became ill as a result of H7N2 virus infection recovered completely. Other human infections with avian influenza viruses have resulted mostly from prolonged close contact with infected birds.

Finding an avian influenza virus in an unexpected host (like a domestic cat) is always concerning and any human infection with a non-human influenza virus is concerning as well. These incidents must be carefully investigated and appropriate actions taken to ensure that there is no ongoing spread of this H7N2 virus among people.

Animal and public health experts are working together to learn more about this situation and the characteristics of this virus. More than 350 people with exposure to infected cats during this outbreak have been screened or tested for infection with H7N2. The ill person reported by New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (NYC DOHMH) is the only human infection that has been detected. This, combined with past experience with rare avian influenza infections in humans via birds, suggest that the risk of human infection is low, but likely increases with duration and intensity of exposure. It is possible that additional human infections could be detected in association with this outbreak in cats. The risk of human infection from contact with an H7N2-infected person also is thought to be low. The risk posed by this virus to the public (people who have no contact with infected cats or an infected person) is thought to be very low at this time.

CDC is in close communication with human and animal health partners regarding this situation, providing situation-specific guidance related to testing, clinical management, antiviral treatment and chemoprophylaxis, and infection control to support the on-the-ground response, which is being led by public health and animal health experts in New York City. The investigation revealed that the person infected with H7N2 traveled on a domestic flight while potentially infectious. CDC is beginning a contact investigation to notify the passengers seated near this traveler who may have been exposed to the disease. CDC has disease-specific instructions (protocols) to identify passengers who may have been exposed during a flight. This investigation will focus on the persons sitting near the ill traveler. State and local health department officials will reach out to the traveler contact(s) in their jurisdictions and provide recommendations and instructions for laboratory testing or clinical follow-up when needed.

CDC has long-standing guidance for cat owners, including that people wash their hands with soap and running water after contact with cats, cat saliva or stool, and after cleaning a litter box. In the context of the current outbreak in New York, people who have adopted cats from affected shelters and whose cats are showing signs of respiratory illness should minimize close contact with their pet during its illness and manage their cats illness at home in consultation with a private veterinarian as recommended by NYC DOHMH. More guidance for pet owners from NYC DOHMH is available. Recommended precautions are even more important for people who are at high risk of serious flu complications, such as those who are being treated for cancer, or who have other chronic health conditions such as diabetes, heart disease, liver disease or kidney disease or women who are pregnant. Any influenza infection can be more serious in these people.

CDC also has examined the genetic sequence of the virus isolated from an infected cat in an animal shelter ‎to see if there are genetic changes known to be associated with improved ability to infect and cause illness in mammals. (Subtyping was performed by the Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) provided CDC with the sequencing information.) CDC will begin additional laboratory work with the specimen submitted by New York, including isolating the virus to try to grow it and then conduct further testing to look at the ability of this particular virus to infect and cause disease in animal models. Also, CDC will conduct testing to see whether an existing H7N2 candidate vaccine virus from 2002 could protect people against the 2016 H7N2 virus. CDC routinely develops influenza candidate vaccine viruses when novel influenza viruses are found in people and this was done with the virus isolated from the human infection in 2002.

The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) issued press releases on December 12 and December 22, 2016.

DOHMH issued a veterinary advisory[382 KB, 3 Pages] on December 16, 2016

More information is available about the outbreak of avian influenza A (H7N2) among cats at animal shelters in New York City

 
 
  • Page last reviewed: December 22, 2016
  • Page last updated: December 22, 2016

https://www.cdc.gov/flu/spotlights/avian-influenza-cats.htm

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H7N2 Questions & Answers

Cats can make great companions, but cat owners should be aware that cats can carry germs that can make people sick. Keep in mind that even cats that appear healthy can spread germs to people and other animals. Always wash your hands with soap and running water after contact with cats, cat saliva or feces, and after cleaning a litter box. Thoroughly washing your hands can help reduce the risk of disease transmission between people and pets. More advice on staying healthy while enjoying your pet cat can be found at Healthy Pets, Healthy People: Cats.

What is H7N2?

H7N2 is an influenza virus that normally circulates in birds. Avian influenza viruses, commonly known as “bird flu” or “avian flu,” do not normally infect humans, but rare cases of human infection have occurred in the past. Most often, human infections with bird flu viruses result from direct contact with infected birds.

Recently CDC became aware of an outbreak of low pathogenic avian influenza A (H7N2) virus (LPAI H7N2) among cats in animal shelters in New York City. One human infection was detected in a person who had close, prolonged unprotected exposure to the respiratory secretions of H7N2 infected, sick cats at an affected shelter. For people who are in close contact with infected cats, the risk of infection is thought to be low. However, it is possible that additional human infections could occur.

Is this H7N2 virus the same as ‘cat flu’?

No, ‘cat flu’ is an everyday term people use to describe infections in cats caused by two viruses that are not actually influenza viruses. One is feline calicivirus, and the other is a feline herpes virus. These viruses cannot be transmitted to humans.

How can I tell if my cat has H7N2?

At this time, H7N2 infections have only been found in cats associated with animal shelters in New York City (specifically, the Animal Care Centers of New York City’s (ACC) shelters). No other H7N2 outbreaks or H7N2 infections in cats in the United States have been reported. Therefore, unless your cat recently came from an ACC animal shelter in New York City, the likelihood of your cat having H7N2 is extremely low.

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How does influenza virus spread in cats?

While cats have been reported to occasionally be infected from people with human seasonal influenza viruses, infection with avian influenza such as from infected poultry is known but is not common. However, influenza in cats can spread the same way that human flu spreads—through direct contact (licking, nuzzling); through the air (droplets made from coughing or sneezing, including nasal discharge); and via contaminated surfaces (such as food and water bowls, cages, or through touch). Also, germs in cat saliva may be transferred onto the cat's coat during grooming and can spread germs to people during contact (e.g., petting, kissing) and can also contaminate the pet’s environment.

How can a person catch a flu virus from a cat?

Generally, a person can get infected with a flu virus when enough of the virus gets into their eyes, nose or mouth, or is inhaled (from droplets or possibly dust containing the virus). People can potentially get flu from a sick cat by touching virus-containing secretions from the cat and then touching their eyes, nose or mouth. Also, sick cats may cough or sneeze, which can expel droplets containing the virus into the air that a person can breathe in or that can enter a person’s eyes, nose or mouth.

What are the symptoms of influenza in cats?

While not common, influenza infection in cats has generally resulted in mild illness. Although not all sick cats may develop symptoms, cats infected with influenza virus can develop respiratory illness with the following signs and symptoms:

  • Sneezing
  • Coughing
  • Fever
  • Discharge from the nose or eyes
  • Lack of energy
  • Loss of appetite

Some cats with influenza virus could become severely ill with other complications including pneumonia or secondary bacterial infections. Cats infected with the H7N2 influenza virus in the current outbreak in NYC animal shelters also have shown signs of persistent cough, lip smacking, runny nose, and fever.

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Why is CDC concerned about H7N2?

As part of CDC’s mission to protect the public from emerging health threats, CDC monitors changes in flu viruses found in human and animal populations. Finding a bird flu virus in an unexpected animal, like a cat, is always concerning, because it means the virus has changed in a way that may pose a new health threat. Animal viruses that gain the ability to infect humans are especially concerning because most people will not have existing immune protection against such viruses. Also, there is potential for a pandemic (a global outbreak of disease) to occur when a new animal virus gains the ability to infect humans and also has the ability to spread efficiently from person to person. For these reasons, these incidents must be carefully investigated and appropriate actions taken to ensure that there is no ongoing spread of the novel virus among people.

Is H7N2 dangerous for cats and humans?

The H7N2 virus has been shown to spread quickly in cats, and while most cats infected this far have experienced mild to moderate illness, at least one cat has died. Influenza is a contagious respiratory illness, and any influenza virus, including H7N2, has the potential to cause mild to severe illness or severe flu complications. Of the two previously known cases of human infection with H7N2 virus infection (which occurred in 2002 and 2003), both experienced mild to moderate illness and both recovered.

Is there a human vaccine for H7N2? Will this season’s flu vaccine protect me against H7N2?

No, right now there is no human vaccine to protect against this virus, and this season’s flu vaccine does not offer protection against H7N2. There is a candidate vaccine virus (CVV) in the U.S. pandemic preparedness stockpile that could be provided to flu vaccine manufactures to mass produce a H7N2 flu vaccine in the case of an emergency. CDC will conduct tests to see whether this existing H7N2 CVV would offer protection against the 2016 H7N2 virus.

Is there treatment for a person infected with the H7N2 virus?

Yes, flu antiviral drugs are used to treat seasonal flu illness in children and adults, and what we know about this H7N2 virus so far suggests that currently approved and recommended antiviral drugs should work.

Studies on other flu viruses have shown that early treatment works better and is especially important for people with a higher risk for flu complications.

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Which groups of people are at high risk for developing serious flu-related complications?

CDC believes that the same people who are at high risk of developing complications from seasonal flu would also be at higher risk of serious illness from H7N2. This includes the following: children younger than 5-years-old, especially younger than 2-years-old, people 65 years and older, pregnant women, and people with certain long-term health conditions (like asthma, diabetes, heart disease, weakened immune systems, and neurological or neurodevelopmental conditions).

A full list of people at high risk of flu-related complications is available at People at High Risk of Developing Flu-Related Complications.

Flu complications, depending on their severity, can possibly require hospitalization and sometimes result in death. Consequently, if you own a pet exhibiting flu symptoms, do not allow your sick animal to kiss or lick your face, and it is advisable not to cuddle with your animal if it has a flu-like illness.

Can I get H7N2 from my cat?

If your cat does not have H7N2, you cannot get H7N2 from your cat. If your cat has H7N2, the risk of you getting H7N2 from contact with your cat is low, but likely increases with duration and intensity of exposure.

Can I get H7N2 if I don’t have contact with cats?

Based on what is known at this time, CDC believes that for people who have no contact with infected cats the risk of H7N2 infection is very low.

How many people have been infected with H7N2 in the United States?

Recently one human infection with H7N2 virus was identified in a veterinarian who was caring for sick cats. That infection was associated with an outbreak of H7N2 virus among cats in animal shelters in New York City.

Previously there have been two human infections with similar H7N2 viruses in the United States, occurring in 2002 and 2003. One of these infections was associated with exposure to sick birds (poultry). The second source of infection could not be determined. Both people who became ill as a result of H7N2 virus infection recovered completely.

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What is CDC doing about the H7N2 situation in New York City?

CDC is in close communication with human and animal health partners about this situation and supporting the on-the-ground response, which is being led by public health and animal health experts in New York City.

What should I do if I have a cat?

If you have a cat, it’s not necessary to do more than you normally do to protect yourself from germs that cats carry. CDC recommends washing your hands with running water and soap after contact with cats, their feces, litter box, and their food. It’s also important to seek routine veterinary care for your cat. Healthy Pets, Healthy People: Cats

If your cat seems ill, do not allow your cat to kiss or lick your face, and consult your veterinarian as you normally would.

What should I do if my cat has respiratory symptoms?

Respiratory illness in cats can be caused by many different medical problems including many types of pathogens. Contact your pet’s veterinarian to help determine the cause and the best course of treatment.

What should I do while my cat is sick?

Because of concerns about diseases that can spread between pets and people, young children, senior citizens, pregnant women, and people with weakened immune systems should avoid contact with sick pets.

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Should I avoid places where cats are present?

It is not necessary to avoid places where cats are present. Based on what is known at this time, CDC believes that the risk of human infection from contact with infected cats is low.

Are there things I should do, even if I’m not around cats?

As always, take time to get an annual flu vaccine as soon as flu vaccine becomes available in your community, to protect yourself from the human seasonal flu viruses that are most likely to circulate this season.

Is H7N2 the same as seasonal flu?

N o, H7N2 virus is a non-human, avian influenza virus that normally circulates in birds. Seasonal influenza viruses normally circulate in humans and include H1N1, H3N2 and B-lineage viruses.

 Top of Page

 
 
 
  • Page last reviewed: December 23, 2016
  • Page last updated: December 23, 2016

https://www.cdc.gov/flu/fluincats/h7n2-cat-questions-answers.htm

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Animal Care Centers of NYC’s Cats Quarantined for H7N2 Virus Receive Care, Monitoring at ASPCA Temporary Shelter

National, local agencies take part in massive operation to care for 
hundreds of cats exposed to H7N2 virus

Animal Care Centers to resume operations within two weeks

New York, N.Y.—In coordination with the New York City Health Department (DOHMH) and Animal Care Centers of NYC (ACC), the ASPCA® (American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) – with funding provided by Maddie’s Fund® – has established a temporary quarantine shelter in Queens to care for hundreds of cats exposed to the avian flu virus, H7N2. Last week, more than 450 cats from ACC shelters in Manhattan, Brooklyn and Staten Island were transported to the temporary shelter by ACC and the Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals. The cats will be quarantined at the facility until ongoing lab tests, conducted by the Shelter Medicine Program at the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine, show they are healthy and no longer contagious—likely 45 to 90 days.

ASPCA responders as well as volunteers from other agencies are providing ongoing daily care while veterinary experts closely monitor the cats during the quarantine period. While some of the cats are showing mild flu-like symptoms such as sneezing or runny nose, others are doing well and settling in at the temporary shelter.

“I thank our partners at the ASPCA, ACC, Mayor’s Alliance, and Maddie’s Fund for their unwavering commitment to providing the best care for these cats. This unprecedented effort was made possible by their support. We continue to urge New Yorkers who have adopted cats from ACC shelters to be on alert for symptoms in their pets and take proper precautions,” said Health Commissioner Dr. Mary T. Bassett.

H7N2 is a type of avian influenza virus (bird flu) that sometimes mutates, and transfers to mammals, such as cats. The Health Department reports that most infected cats have experienced only mild illness, and no other animal species at ACC have tested positive for H7N2.

The Health Department investigation of the H7N2 virus confirmed that the risk to humans is low. There has been only one cat-to-human transmission associated with this outbreak; there have been no cases of human-to-human transmission. Under the Health Department’s guidance, the ASPCA has implemented strict protocols to ensure the safety of the responders and cats. These include decontamination training and personal protective equipment for all individuals in direct contact with cats from this population.

“The ASPCA rapid response team has been nothing short of incredible,” said ACC President & CEO Risa Weinstock. “Within hours they were coordinating groups from across the nation to work with our staff to ensure the best care is provided to those cats in quarantine.”

“Responders from the ASPCA, ACC and other agencies are working around the clock to safely monitor and care for these cats,” added ASPCA President & CEO Matt Bershadker. “Once the cats are healthy and no longer contagious, we’ll do everything we can to help them find homes.”

ACC has hired a professional cleaning company to service all facilities and they will resume cat adoptions once the cleaning process is complete.

New Yorkers who adopted a cat from an ACC shelter between November 12 and December 15 should continue to monitor their cats for flu-like symptoms, including sneezing, coughing, runny nose and runny or red eyes. If such symptoms are present, these owners should take their cats to a veterinarian and inform them that the cat may have been exposed to H7N2. This will allow the veterinarians to make arrangements to prevent exposure to other cats in the clinic.

The sheltering and quarantine operation has been made possible by the generous funding from the ASPCA and Maddie’s Fund, a family foundation established by Dave and Cheryl Duffield to revolutionize the status and well-being of companion animals. Maddie’s Fund has also committed to providing grant support to defray veterinary costs incurred by eligible rescue groups that received cats from ACC and treated them for symptoms associated with the virus, medical care to the ACC cats that are in quarantine, testing and retesting of all affected cats, travel expenses for the shelter medicine intern teams as well as thorough cleaning of three ACC shelters.

“This has been an amazing collaboration,” said Dr. Laurie Peek from Maddie’s Fund Executive Leadership Team. “I have been impressed with the ACC’s efforts to save these cats. Multiple agencies have pulled together to respond quickly and effectively to this outbreak, setting a new precedent on dealing with outbreaks in shelters. This type of collaboration – that puts animals and community welfare first – represents the best of the animal welfare movement. We are immensely proud to work with the ASPCA, ACC, University of Wisconsin’s Shelter Medicine program and all the partners on this response.”

Agencies assisting with veterinary and daily care at the shelter include: ACC; Cat Depot (Sarasota, Fla.); Coastal Humane Society (Brunswick, Maine); Florida State Animal Response Coalition (Bushnell, Fla.); Humane SocietyforGreater Savannah (Ga.); Longmont Humane Society (Longmont, Colo.); Mayor’s Alliance for NYC Animals; San Diego Humane Society (Calif.); Shelter Medicine Program at the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine (Madison, Wis.); The Animal Support Project (Cropseyville, N.Y.); Washington State Animal Response Team (Enumclaw, Wash.); and Wayside Waifs (Kansas City, Mo.).

ASPCA Photos & Video (Credit/ASPCA): 
Photos - 
https://aspca.widencollective.com/dam/externalorderpickup/d256b626-91cf-429a-af2d-70ee1d9e99a4
B-roll  https://aspca.widencollective.com/dam/externalorderpickup/41747a89-647a-48f7-8bb7-5f556fd47350

Media contacts: 
ACC—Katy Hansen, khansen@nycacc.org, 646-847-4653            
ASPCA—Kelly Krause, kelly.krause@aspca.org, 646-784-2098
Emily Schneider, emily.schneider@aspca.org, 646-291-4575
Health Department—Julien Martinez, 347-396-4177, pressoffice@health.nyc.gov

About the ASPCA®

Founded in 1866, the ASPCA® (American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) is the first animal welfare organization in North America and serves as the nation’s leading voice for animals. More than two million supporters strong, the ASPCA’s mission is to provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to animals throughout the United States. As a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation, the ASPCA is a national leader in the areas of anti-cruelty, community outreach and animal health services. For more information, please visit www.ASPCA.org, and be sure to follow the ASPCA on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

 

About Animal Care Centers of NYC

Animal Care Centers of NYC (ACC) is one of the largest animal welfare organizations in the country, taking in nearly 35,000 animals each year. ACC is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit that rescues, cares for and finds loving homes for animals throughout the five boroughs. ACC is an open-admissions organization, which means it never turns away any homeless, abandoned, injured or sick animal in need of help, including cats, dogs, rabbits, small mammals, reptiles, birds, farm animals and wildlife. It is the only organization in NYC with this unique responsibility. For more information, please visit www.nycacc.org, and be sure to follow NYCACC on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

 

About the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

With an annual budget of $1.6 billion and more than 6,000 employees throughout the five boroughs, we're one of the largest public health agencies in the world, serving 8 million New Yorkers from diverse ethnic, cultural and economic backgrounds. With over 200 years of leadership in the field, we're also one of our nation's oldest public health agencies. Our work is broad ranging. You see us in the inspection grades of most every dining establishment, the licenses that dogs both great and small wear in open park spaces, the low to no-cost health clinics in your neighborhoods, and the birth certificates received for newborns. The challenges we face are many. They range from obesity, diabetes and heart disease to HIV/AIDS, tobacco addiction and substance abuse, and the threat of bioterrorism. The New York City Health Department is tackling these issues with innovative policies and programs, and getting exceptional results. www.nyc.gov/health

 

About Maddie’s Fund

Maddie's Fund® is a family foundation created in 1994 by Workday® co-founder Dave Duffield and his wife, Cheryl, who have endowed the Foundation with more than $300 million. Since then, the Foundation has awarded more than $187.8 million in grants toward increased community lifesaving, shelter medicine education, and pet adoptions across the U.S. The Duffields named Maddie's Fund after their Miniature Schnauzer Maddie, who always made them laugh and gave them much joy. Maddie was with Dave and Cheryl from 1987 - 1997 and continues to inspire them today. Maddie's Fund is the fulfillment of a promise to an inspirational dog, investing its resources to create a no-kill nation where every dog and cat is guaranteed a healthy home or habitat. #ThanksToMaddie.

 

About the Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals

The Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals® is a 501(c)(3) non-profit charity that works with more than 150 partner rescue groups and shelters to offer important programs and services that save the lives of NYC’s homeless animals. We are supported entirely by donations from foundations, corporations, and individuals and receive no government funding. Since our founding in 2003, we have remained committed to transforming New York City into a community where no dogs or cats of reasonable health and temperament will be killed merely because they do not have homes. www.AnimalAllianceNYC.org

 

About the Shelter Medicine Program at the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine

The University of Wisconsin-Madison Shelter Medicine Program is committed to saving animal lives while improving animal health and well-being in shelters through shelter outreach and support, education and training, and the development of knowledge in the field.

http://www1.nyc.gov/site/doh/about/press/pr2017/acc-cat-flu.page

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221460 Confirmed

Americas/United States of America/New York National New York /

Lat.: 40.788639, Long.: -73.960303

09/12/2016 12/01/2017 Influenza - Avian H7N2

LPAI 450 domestic, cat

Geocoords. Quality: Centroid Admin2

http://empres-i.fao.org/eipws3g/

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