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HPAI H7 In Commercial Chicken Farm Lincoln Co Tennessee

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The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has confirmed the presence of highly pathogenic H7 avian influenza (HPAI) of North American wild bird lineage in a commercial chicken breeder flock in Lincoln County, Tennessee. This is the first confirmed case of HPAI in commercial poultry in the United States this year. The flock of 73,500 is located within the Mississippi flyway.

https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/USDAAPHIS/bulletins/18b5193

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USDA Confirms Highly Pathogenic H7 Avian Influenza in a Commercial Flock in Lincoln County, Tennessee

Contacts: Donna Karlsons, 301-851-4107 
Donna.L.Karlsons@aphis.usda.gov 
Lyndsay Cole, 970-494-7410 
Lyndsay.M.Cole@aphis.usda.gov

March 5, 2017, Washington – The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has confirmed the presence of highly pathogenic H7 avian influenza (HPAI) of North American wild bird lineage in a commercial chicken breeder flock in Lincoln County, Tennessee. This is the first confirmed case of HPAI in commercial poultry in the United States this year. The flock of 73,500 is located within the Mississippi flyway.

Samples from the affected flock, which experienced increased mortality, were tested at Tennessee’s Kord Animal Health Diagnostic Laboratory and confirmed at the APHIS National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) in Ames, Iowa.  Virus isolation is ongoing, and NVSL expects to characterize the neuraminidase protein, or “N-type”, of the virus within 48 hours.

APHIS is working closely with the Tennessee Department of Agriculture on a joint incident response. State officials quarantined the affected premises and birds on the property will be depopulated to prevent the spread of the disease. Birds from the flock will not enter the food system.

The Tennessee Department of Agriculture is working directly with poultry workers at the affected facility to ensure that they are taking the proper precautions to prevent illness and contain disease spread. As a reminder, the proper handling and cooking of poultry and eggs to an internal temperature of 165 ˚F kills bacteria and viruses.

As part of existing avian influenza response plans, Federal and State partners are working jointly on additional surveillance and testing in the nearby area. The United States has the strongest AI surveillance program in the world, and USDA is working with its partners to actively look for the disease in commercial poultry operations, live bird markets and in migratory wild bird populations.

USDA will be informing the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) as well as international trading partners of this finding. USDA also continues to communicate with trading partners to encourage adherence to OIE standards and minimize trade impacts. OIE trade guidelines call on countries to base trade restrictions on sound science and, whenever possible, limit restrictions to those animals and animal products within a defined region that pose a risk of spreading disease of concern.

These virus strains can travel in wild birds without them appearing sick. People should avoid contact with sick/dead poultry or wildlife. If contact occurs, wash your hands with soap and water and change clothing before having any contact with healthy domestic poultry and birds.

All bird owners, whether commercial producers or backyard enthusiasts, should continue to practice good biosecurity, prevent contact between their birds and wild birds, and report sick birds or unusual bird deaths to State/Federal officials, either through their state veterinarian or through USDA’s toll-free number at 1-866-536-7593.  Additional information on biosecurity for can be found at www.aphis.usda.gov/animalhealth/defendtheflock.

Additional background  

Avian influenza (AI) is caused by an influenza type A virus which can infect poultry (such as chickens, turkeys, pheasants, quail, domestic ducks, geese and guinea fowl) and is carried by free flying waterfowl such as ducks, geese and shorebirds. AI viruses are classified by a combination of two groups of proteins: hemagglutinin or “H” proteins, of which there are 16 (H1–H16), and neuraminidase or “N” proteins, of which there are 9 (N1–N9). Many different combinations of “H” and “N” proteins are possible. Each combination is considered a different subtype, and can be further broken down into different strains. AI viruses are further classified by their pathogenicity (low or high)— the ability of a particular virus strain to produce disease in domestic chickens. 

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Virus Deadly to Poultry Detected in Tennessee

Sunday, March 05, 2017 | 12:11pm

NASHVILLE — The state veterinarian confirms that a strain of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) has sickened a commercial chicken breeder flock in Lincoln County.

“Many Tennessee families rely on the poultry industry for their livelihoods, and the state is working closely with local, county and federal partners and the poultry industry to control the situation and protect the flocks that are critical to our state’s economy,” Gov. Bill Haslam said.

HPAI is known to be deadly for domesticated chickens and turkeys. On March 3, a commercial chicken facility in Lincoln County alerted the state veterinarian’s office at the Tennessee Department of Agriculture to an increase in chicken deaths. Testing at state and federal laboratories confirmed the presence of H7 HPAI in samples from that flock.

“Animal health is our top priority,” state veterinarian, Dr. Charles Hatcher, DVM said. “With this HPAI detection, we are moving quickly and aggressively to prevent the virus from spreading.”

The facility is under quarantine, along with approximately 30 other poultry farms within a 10 kilometer radius (6.2 miles) of the site. The affected flock is being depopulated to stop potential spread of the illness, and officials are testing and monitoring other flocks within the quarantined area. No other flocks have experienced an increase in mortality.

HPAI does not pose a risk to the food supply. No affected animals entered the food chain. The risk of human infection with avian influenza during poultry outbreaks is very low. In fact, no transmission to humans was reported during the outbreak that affected commercial poultry farms in the Midwestern United States in 2015. Also, this is not the same strain identified in that outbreak. However, out of an abundance of caution, officials with the Tennessee Department of Health and Tennessee Department of Agriculture are working together to address concerns about the health of individuals who are working on site or had contact with affected birds. 

Prior to this HPAI case, the most recent U.S. detection was in January of 2016 in a commercial turkey flock in Indiana.

“Although this is a situation no state wants to face, Tennessee has been actively preparing to respond to HPAI since it was first identified as a threat,” Commissioner of Agriculture Jai Templeton said.

This is the first time highly pathogenic avian influenza has been detected in Tennessee, however low path avian influenza has affected Tennessee poultry flocks in the past. State officials and partners have extensive experience in effectively containing the virus. The plan for the control of avian influenza includes coordination of resources and response, and protocols for quarantine, testing, disposal, cleaning, disinfection and monitoring.

Owners of commercial and backyard poultry flocks are encouraged to closely observe their birds.

* Report a sudden increase in the number of sick birds or bird deaths to the state veterinarian’s office at 615- 837-5120 and/or USDA at 1-866-536-7593
* Prevent contact with wild birds
* Practice good biosecurity with your poultry flock
* Enroll in the National Poultry Improvement Plan 
* Follow Animal Health Alert updates

The source of the Lincoln County virus has not yet been determined. This version of H7 HPAI is confirmed as a North American wild bird lineage. 

The state veterinarian and staff are focused on animal health and disease prevention. Each year, the Kord Animal Health lab tests approximately 22,000 samples from poultry for avian flu.

- See more at: https://www.tn.gov/agriculture/news/48946#sthash.3amJYiIR.dpuf

https://www.tn.gov/agriculture/news/48946

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Interview With State Vet Part 1

 

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Interview with State Vet Part 2

 

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TYSON FOODS’ STATEMENT ON AVIAN INFLUENZA IN TENNESSEE 

March 5, 2017
 

We're addressing a form of avian influenza on a single contract chicken farm in Tennessee. It's a bird health issue and not a food safety or human health concern. We’re responding aggressively, and are working with state and federal officials to contain the virus by euthanizing chickens located on the farm. This not only prevents the potential spread of disease, it is more humane for the infected birds. All flocks located within a six-mile radius of the farm will be tested and will not be transported unless they test negative for the virus. Based on the limited scope known to us at this time, we don’t expect disruptions to our chicken business and plan to meet our customers’ needs.
 

 

All of our U.S. poultry operations continue to operate under heightened biosecurity as a result of outbreaks that affected the poultry industry in the U.S. in 2015. Our precautions include the elimination of all non-essential visitor access to our contract farms, maintaining proper disinfection of vehicles entering farms and the use of a biosecurity uniform for all visitors. Additional precautions for on-farm footwear have been established to prevent potential tracking of the virus into poultry houses. Tyson Foods employees who come in contact with live birds have received additional training specifically designed to help protect against the spread of avian influenza and we frequently communicate additional biosecurity guidance to the farmers who grow for our company.
 

 

Consumers should know that this is an animal health issue and not a food safety issue. In the unlikely event that any chickens affected by avian influenza were ever processed, there’s no evidence to suggest that any form of avian influenza can be transmitted to humans from properly cooked poultry. According to the World Health Organization and the CDC, properly cooked poultry (minimum of 165 degrees with proper hygiene) is perfectly safe to eat.
 

 

Out of an abundance of caution, we test all Tyson-owned flocks for the virus before they leave the farm, and we know the results before they’re processed. Should any flock be diagnosed with highly pathogenic avian influenza, farms are immediately quarantined and birds from them are not processed.
 

Additional information is available from the USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services and from the Tennessee Department of Agriculture.

 

Media Contact: Worth Sparkman, 479-290-6358, worth.sparkman@tyson.com

http://www.tysonfoods.com/media/position-statements/avian-influenza-in-tennessee

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Bird flu found in Tennessee chicken flock on Tyson-contracted farm

 
 
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FILE PHOTO: The Avian influenza virus is harvested from a chicken egg as part of a diagnostic process in this undated U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) handout image. Erica Spackman/USDA/Handout/File Photo via REUTERS
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By Jo Winterbottom

A strain of bird flu has been detected in a chicken breeder flock on a Tennessee farm contracted to U.S. food giant Tyson Foods Inc, and the 73,500 birds will be culled to stop the virus from entering the food system, government and company officials said on Sunday.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture said this represented the first confirmed case of highly pathogenic H7 avian influenza (HPAI) in commercial poultry in the United States this year. It is the first time HPAI has been found in Tennessee, the state government said.

Tyson, the biggest chicken meat producer in the United States, said in a statement it was working with Tennessee and federal officials to contain the virus by euthanizing the birds on the contract farm.

In 2014 and 2015, during a widespread outbreak of HPAI, the United States killed nearly 50 million birds, mostly egg-laying hens. The losses pushed U.S. egg prices to record highs and prompted trading partners to ban imports of American poultry, even though there was little infection then in the broiler industry.

No people were affected in that outbreak, which was primarily of the H5N2 strain. The risk of human infection in poultry outbreaks is low, although in China people have died this winter amid an outbreak of the H7N9 virus in birds.

The facility in Tennessee's Lincoln County has been placed under quarantine, along with approximately 30 other poultry farms within a 6.2-mile (10 km) radius of the site, the state said. Other flocks in the quarantined area are being tested, it added.

Tyson, the USDA and the state did not name the facility involved. Tyson said that it did not expect disruptions to its chicken business.

The USDA should have more information by Monday evening about the particular strain of the virus involved, spokeswoman Donna Karlsons said by email.

HPAI bird flu was last found in a commercial turkey flock in Indiana in January 2016.

The USDA said it would inform the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) and international trading partners of the outbreak.

The biggest traditional markets for U.S. chicken meat are Mexico and Canada, which introduced state or regional bans on U.S. broiler exports after the outbreak two years ago, and China, which imposed a national ban.

Tennessee's broiler production is too small to rank it in the top five U.S. producing states but it is the third-largest generator of cash receipts in agriculture for the state.

In January, the USDA detected bird flu in a wild duck in Montana that appeared to match one of the strains found during the 2014 and 2015 outbreak.

The United States stepped up biosecurity measures aimed at preventing the spread of bird flu after the outbreak two years ago.

Tyson said precautions being taken include disinfecting all vehicles entering farms and banning all nonessential visitor access to contract farms.

In recent months, different strains of bird flu have been confirmed across Asia and in Europe. Authorities have culled millions of birds in affected areas to control the outbreaks.

France, which has the largest poultry flock in the European Union, has reported outbreaks of the highly contagious H5N8 bird flu virus. In South Korea, the rapid spread of the H5N6 strain of the virus has led to the country's worst-ever outbreak of bird flu.

 

(Reporting by Lewis Krauskopf in New York and Jo Winterbottom in Chicago; Editing by Will Dunham)

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-birdflu-usa-idUSKBN16C0XL

 

 

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Posted (edited)

South Korea to ban imports of U.S. poultry as bird flu found in U.S.

Reuters

SEOUL (Reuters) - South Korea will ban imports of U.S. poultry after a strain of H7 bird flu virus was confirmed at a U.S. chicken farm, the agriculture ministry said on Monday.

The import ban will be effective from March 6, the agriculture ministry said in a statement.

South Korea, Asia's fourth-largest economy, has been importing eggs from the United States as its worst-ever bird flu outbreak has tightened the country's egg supplies.

(Reporting By Jane Chung; Editing by Richard Pullin)

https://www.yahoo.com/news/south-korea-ban-imports-u-poultry-bird-flu-020522005.html?soc_src=hl-viewer&soc_trk=tw

Edited by Admin

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agi-info.png?sfvrsn=0
PRESS RELEASE 
 

Monday, March 6, 2017                                                                 Contact: Amy Belcher 334-240-7126

 

Avian Influenza Detected near Alabama Border

 

Montgomery, AL – On Sunday, March 5, 2017, the United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) confirmed the presence of highly pathogenic H7 avian influenza (HPAI) in a commercial chicken breeder flock in Lincoln County, Tennessee. This is the first confirmed case of HPAI in commercial poultry in the United States this year. Samples from the affected flock, which experienced increased mortality, were tested at Tennessee’s Kord Animal Health Diagnostic Laboratory and confirmed at the APHIS National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) in Ames, Iowa.  Virus isolation is ongoing and a control zone has been established.

Since Lincoln County, Tennessee borders Alabama, portions of Alabama are within the control zone which includes one commercial Tyson farm. Tyson collected samples from the farm and they have tested negative for avian influenza. The department is adhering to Alabama’s HPAI Preparedness and Response Plan. The first priority is to test commercial poultry, but backyard flocks are also included. State Veterinarian Dr. Tony Frazier dispatched staff professionals to go into the communities (door-to-door) within the control zone on Sunday, March 5 to collect samples from backyard flocks. Roughly 14-15 premises have been inspected and it is estimated that this surveillance is 95% complete. This surveillance should be completed by noon today.

Commissioner John McMillan has spoken directly with Tennessee Commissioner of Agriculture Jai Templeton and assured him that our department staff will continue to work closely with the Tennessee Department of Agriculture. “I want to assure all Alabamians that our department will continue our surveillance for avian influenza and approach this incident with an abundance of caution.  Every flock of chickens in Alabama is tested for avian influenza before being processed for human consumption,” said Commissioner McMillan. 

The facility in Tennessee is under quarantine, along with approximately 30 other poultry farms within a 10 kilometer radius (6.2 miles) of the site. The affected flock has been depopulated to stop potential spread of the illness and officials are testing and monitoring other flocks within the control zone. No other flocks in the control zone have experienced an increase in mortality and the first round of testing has all been negative for avian influenza.

 

HPAI does not pose a risk to the food supply. No affected animals entered the food chain. The risk of human infection with avian influenza during poultry outbreaks is very low. In fact, no transmission to humans was reported during the outbreak that affected commercial poultry farms in the Midwestern United States in 2015. Also, this is not the same strain identified in that outbreak. However, out of an abundance of caution, officials with the Tennessee Department of Health and Tennessee Department of Agriculture are working together to address concerns about the health of individuals who are working on site or had contact with affected birds. 

 

Alabama State Veterinarian Dr. Tony Frazier has been working closely with Tennessee State Veterinarian Dr. Charlie Hatcher and encourages commercial poultry producers and backyard flock owners to observe their birds closely and continue to practice strict biosecurity measures. These include:

  • Isolating birds from other animals
  • Wearing clothing designated for use only at the poultry house
  • Minimizing access to people and unsanitized equipment
  • Keeping the area around the poultry buildings clean and uninviting to wild birds and animals
  • Sanitizing the facility between flocks
  • Cleaning equipment entering and leaving the farm
  • Having an all in, all out policy regarding the placement and removal of the poultry
  • Properly disposing of bedding material and mortalities
  • Avoiding contact with migratory waterfowl

Frazier reminds all poultry owners and producers to strictly adhere to the biosecurity guidelines mentioned above.  During this time, backyard flock owners should refrain from moving birds offsite or introducing new birds. The Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries Poultry Division is available to answer any questions concerning movement of poultry and should be notified at 334-240-6584 if birds show unusual signs of disease (flu-like symptoms) or flocks experiences unexplained mortalities.

The Alabama Cooperative Extension System has created a website to assist backyard flock owners with maintaining healthy birds and to provide answers for Avian Influenza control.  It can be found at www.AlabamaAvianInfluenza.com.

http://www.agi.alabama.gov/s/avian-influenza-detached-near-alabama-border

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Avian Influenza

 

The Facts - Week of March 6, 2017

  • Avian influenza has been confirmed in a Lincoln County, Tenn., breeder flock.
  • State and federal officials have established a 6-mile diameter control around the site of the infected flock. Because the Tennessee farm is near the Alabama border, portions of Alabama are in the quarantine zone.
  • Testing is required at least weekly in the infected and buffer zones of all poultry premises. All samples will be collected by trained state personnel and tested in one of the state diagnostic labs.
  • All flocks that test positive must have flock plans and compliance agreements to cover procedures necessary to develop response and emergency plans.
  • Quarantine regulations will restrict movement of all poultry and equipment especially in and from the infected zone.
  • Consumers can be confident in the safety of poultry products. Affected birds do not enter the food chain.

What Backyard Flock Owners Can Do

  • Continue effective biosecurity measures.
  • Do not move birds from their current location.
  • Do not visit farms or other households with poultry.
  • If you travel to a place where other birds are present or even to the feed store, clean and disinfect tires, poultry cages and equipment before returning to your property. These can harbor germs.
  • Keep out unnecessary visitors. Other people and birds—including new birds recently purchased and wild birds—can carry diseases to backyard flocks.
  • If visitors have birds of their own, do not let them enter your bird area or have any access to your birds.
  • Be sure that feeders are in a covered location where wild birds cannot gain access. This will help reduce the potential for disease carried in the droppings of wild birds.

Alabama Poultry Industry at a Glance

  • Alabama is the nation's second largest producer of broilers (chickens bred and raised for meat production).
  • Poultry and egg production generate more than $15 billion a year in Alabama.
  • More than 85,000 jobs in the state relate to the poultry and egg business.
  • Top broiler producing counties:
    1. Cullman
    2. Dekalb
    3. Marshall

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Just now, Admin said:

Avian Influenza

 

The Facts - Week of March 6, 2017

  • Avian influenza has been confirmed in a Lincoln County, Tenn., breeder flock.
  • State and federal officials have established a 6-mile diameter control around the site of the infected flock. Because the Tennessee farm is near the Alabama border, portions of Alabama are in the quarantine zone.
  • Testing is required at least weekly in the infected and buffer zones of all poultry premises. All samples will be collected by trained state personnel and tested in one of the state diagnostic labs.
  • All flocks that test positive must have flock plans and compliance agreements to cover procedures necessary to develop response and emergency plans.
  • Quarantine regulations will restrict movement of all poultry and equipment especially in and from the infected zone.
  • Consumers can be confident in the safety of poultry products. Affected birds do not enter the food chain.

What Backyard Flock Owners Can Do

  • Continue effective biosecurity measures.
  • Do not move birds from their current location.
  • Do not visit farms or other households with poultry.
  • If you travel to a place where other birds are present or even to the feed store, clean and disinfect tires, poultry cages and equipment before returning to your property. These can harbor germs.
  • Keep out unnecessary visitors. Other people and birds—including new birds recently purchased and wild birds—can carry diseases to backyard flocks.
  • If visitors have birds of their own, do not let them enter your bird area or have any access to your birds.
  • Be sure that feeders are in a covered location where wild birds cannot gain access. This will help reduce the potential for disease carried in the droppings of wild birds.

Alabama Poultry Industry at a Glance

  • Alabama is the nation's second largest producer of broilers (chickens bred and raised for meat production).
  • Poultry and egg production generate more than $15 billion a year in Alabama.
  • More than 85,000 jobs in the state relate to the poultry and egg business.
  • Top broiler producing counties:
    1. Cullman
    2. Dekalb
    3. Marshall

http://www.aces.edu/eden/agricultural-disasters/avian-influenza/

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Posted (edited)

Tennessee Press Conference

 

Edited by Admin

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