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HPAI H7N9 NA Lineage Confirmed Lincoln Co Tennessee

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USDA Issues Update on Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza in Tennessee

Contact: 
Donna Karlsons, 301-851-4107 
Donna.L.Karlsons@aphis.usda.gov 
Lyndsay Cole, 970-494-7410 
Lyndsay.M.Cole@aphis.usda.gov

USDA’s National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) has confirmed the full subtype for the highly pathogenic H7 avian influenza reported in Lincoln County, TN. The virus has been identified as North American wild bird lineage H7N9 HPAI based upon full genome sequence analysis of the samples at the NVSL. All eight gene segments of the virus are North American wild bird lineage. This is NOT the same as the China H7N9 virus that has impacted poultry and infected humans in Asia. While the subtype is the same as the China H7N9 lineage that emerged in 2013, this is a different virus and is genetically distinct from the China H7N9 lineage.

As additional background, avian influenza viruses are classified by a combination of two groups of proteins: hemagglutinin or “H” proteins, of which there are 16 (H1–H16), and neuraminidase or “N” proteins, of which there are 9 (N1–N9). Many different combinations of “H” and “N” proteins are possible. Each combination is considered a different subtype, and subtypes are further broken down into different strains. Genetically related strains within a subtype are referred to as lineage.

USDA continues to work with the Tennessee Department of Agriculture on the joint incident response. Birds on the affected premises have been depopulated, and burial is in progress.  An epidemiological investigation is underway to determine the source of the infection.

Federal and state partners continue to conduct surveillance and testing of poultry within an expanded 10-mile radius around the affected premises to ensure all commercial operations in the area are disease-free. In addition, strict movement controls are in place within an established control zone to prevent the disease from spreading. As of yesterday, all commercial premises within the surveillance area had been tested, and all of the tests from the surrounding facilities were negative for disease. Officials will continue to observe commercial and backyard poultry for signs of influenza, and all flocks in the surveillance zone will be tested again.

The rapid testing and response in this incident is the result of extensive planning with local, state, federal and industry partners to ensure the most efficient and effective coordination. Since the previous HPAI detections in 2015 and 2016, APHIS and its state and industry partners have learned valuable lessons to help implement stronger preparedness and response capabilities.

More information about avian influenza can be found on the USDA avian influenza page.

https://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/newsroom/news/sa_by_date/sa-2017/hpai-tn-update

Edited by niman

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March 7, 2017 - UPDATE from TN Department of Agriculture:

  • USDA’s National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) confirms the virus that affected the Lincoln County, Tenn. facility is H7N9, of North American wild bird lineage (please see press release, linked below).
  • This is NOT the same as the China H7N9 virus affecting Asia. This virus is genetically distinct from the China H7N9 lineage.
  • No additional poultry within the surveillance area have shown signs of illness.
  • All samples from poultry within the surveillance area have tested negative for HPAI.
  • The surveillance zone is a 10 mile radius of the affected facility.
  • The control/quarantine zone is a 10 km radius of the affected facility.
  • The control/quarantine zone includes approximately 50 other commercial poultry houses.
  • For testing of backyard poultry flocks, only those within the control/quarantine zone will be sampled.
  • The investigation continues to determine the source of the virus.

USDA Press Release

- See more at: https://www.tn.gov/agriculture/article/ag-businesses-avianinfluenza#sthash.Byks9ZZC.dpuf

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CDC: Outbreak of North American avian influenza A(H7N9) in poultry poses low risk to people

Media Statement

For Immediate Release: Wednesday, March 8, 2017
Contact: Media Relations,
(404) 639-3286

CDC: Outbreak of North American avian influenza A(H7N9) in poultry poses low risk to people

CDC is working closely with USDA APHIS and the Tennessee Department of Health to minimize any human health risk posed by the avian influenza outbreak in Lincoln County, Tennessee. This includes implementing a protocol to monitor the health of poultry workers exposed to commercial poultry involved in the  USDA/APHIS-confirmed highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) A (H7N9) outbreak. At this time, no human infections associated with this outbreak in Tennessee have been detected.

CDC considers the risk to the public's health from this North American H7N9 virus outbreak in commercial poultry to be low. In the past, there have only been a small number (fewer than 10 in 15 years) of reported human infections with North American avian influenza A H7 viruses. Most were associated with poultry exposure and have resulted in mild respiratory illness and/or conjunctivitis.

While the risk of human infection is low, CDC is working closely with USDA APHIS and state and local agriculture and public health partners to communicate about the possible impact on people of this animal outbreak, including steps people can take to reduce possible risk. CDC has longstanding guidance for the public related to previous domestic HPAI outbreaks

  • avoid wild birds and observe them only from a distance;
  • avoid contact with domestic birds (poultry) that appear ill or have died;
  • avoid contact with surfaces that appear to be contaminated with feces from wild or domestic birds.

CDC will provide updates as new information about the Tennessee outbreak is available.

CDC works 24/7 with public health and animal health officials in the U.S. and around the world to remain alert to reports of influenza A outbreaks in animals because influenza pandemics can result when a new (novel) influenza A virus emerges to infect people. CDC and non-CDC influenza experts have developed the Influenza Risk Assessment Tool to assess the possible pandemic risk posed by new influenza A viruses. Results are summarized routinely in a public table. CDC’s International Influenza Program works with a wide range of international partners including WHO and national ministries to build capacity to respond to pandemics and to reduce the effects of seasonal influenza.

Aware that new pandemics can arise at any time, CDC and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) have worked over the past decade to increase the capacity for global pandemic response. Influenza pandemic preparedness is only attained through the continued development and maintenance of a robust global influenza surveillance and detection network. Tools have been developed and refined to guide planning and response, including evaluating the pandemic risk posed by a new influenza A virus, assessing the potential public health impact posed by a new influenza A virus; understanding the possible progression of a pandemic; developing a pre-pandemic candidate vaccine virus, or vaccine; and evaluating the severity and transmissibility of the virus to inform public health interventions.

###

https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2017/s0308-h7n9.html

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March 8, 2017 - UPDATE from the TN Department of Agriculture:

  • No additional poultry within the surveillance area have shown signs of illness.
  • All samples from poultry within the surveillance area have tested negative for HPAI.
  • The surveillance zone is a 10 mile radius of the affected facility.
  • The control/quarantine zone is a 10 km radius of the affected facility.
  • For testing of backyard poultry flocks, only those within the control/quarantine zone will be sampled.
  • The investigation continues to determine the source of the virus.

- See more at: https://www.tn.gov/agriculture/article/ag-businesses-avianinfluenza#sthash.6rFuLKI5.dpuf

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Highly pathogenic avian influenza,
United States of America
 
Information received on 08/03/2017 from Dr John Clifford, Official Delegate, Chief Trade Advisor, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, United States of America
Summary
Report type Follow-up report No. 1
Date of start of the event 01/03/2017
Date of confirmation of the event 04/03/2017
Report date 08/03/2017
Date submitted to OIE 08/03/2017
Reason for notification Reoccurrence of a listed disease
Date of previous occurrence 2016
Manifestation of disease Clinical disease
Causal agent Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus
Serotype H7N9
Nature of diagnosis Laboratory (advanced)
This event pertains to a defined zone within the country
Related reports Immediate notification (06/03/2017) 
Follow-up report No. 1 (08/03/2017) 
Outbreaks There are no new outbreaks in this report
Epidemiology
Source of the outbreak(s) or origin of infection
  • Unknown or inconclusive
Epidemiological comments The USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), in conjunction with the Tennessee Department of Agriculture, are continuing to respond to the identification of a highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H7N9 of North American wild bird lineage based on full genome sequence analysis in a chicken broiler breeder flock. All eight gene segments of the virus are North American wild bird lineage. This is NOT the same as the China H7N9 lineage that has impacted poultry and infected humans in Asia. Although the subtypes are the same (H7N9) the virus detected in the United States is a very different virus, genetically distinct from the China H7N9 lineage. A comprehensive epidemiological investigation in the surrounding area is continuing and enhanced surveillance and testing has begun. The first round of testing of all commercial poultry premises in a 10 mile (16 kilometer) surveillance zone has been completed with all results negative for avian influenza virus. State officials have quarantined the affected premises and implemented movement controls. Depopulation of birds on the premises has been completed and disposal of the birds is near completion.
 
Control measures
Measures applied
  • Movement control inside the country
  • Quarantine
  • Surveillance outside containment and/or protection zone
  • Stamping out
  • Official disposal of carcasses, by-products and waste
  • Surveillance within containment and/or protection zone
  • Zoning
  • Vaccination prohibited
  • No treatment of affected animals
Measures to be applied
  • Disinfection / Disinfestation
Diagnostic test results
Laboratory name and type Species Test Test date Result
National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) (National laboratory) Birds virus isolation   Pending
National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) (National laboratory) Birds virus sequencing 07/03/2017 Positive
Future Reporting
The event is continuing. Weekly follow-up reports will be submitted.

http://www.oie.int/wahis_2/public/wahid.php/Reviewreport/Review?page_refer=MapFullEventReport&reportid=23161

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